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of a trend. also the effects of elevation, these are very important to us. precipitation, that is our bread and butter. what form does it fall into a range versus no, how much of it falls? the timing of precipitation. these are critical factors that are engaged in such work. the variability is where our vulnerability is come. this includes drought, storm intensity. what is the severity of drought in the future? how much worse will storms get in the future? what will this mean for water quality? of course, there is a sea level rise. this is a critical factor for those of us along the coast. climate change affects the hydrological. precipitation, compensation. -- condensation. we are seen as first responders to the potential effect of climate change. our everyday work is bound up in the hydrological cycle. i'm going over not so much why we should care but how we should care about climate change, how we should approach evaluating the issue. we are approaching this on a timer rise in which matches up with the way we think. most apartments have capital programs. frequently, we think of capital i
buy at your store, and it has a big role. it protects public health. however, its primary use for us is disinfection. disinfection of drinking water and also the treatment of water. it is also used for odor control in our waste water collection system. so it will be this last piece that i will be focusing the discussion on today. this was question a lot in the media, so i will talk about that in one piece. i should note that it is one of the many methods that we used to combat odor in waste water. so where do we use this? on the charts year, about 50% of the sodium hypochlorite is used for disinfecting water. about 30% is used for disinfecting and treating waste water, and the remaining amount is used for over control -- odor control. it is not the only chemical we use. we also use peroxide and a ferriss solution -- ferous -- ferrous solution. they are cite specific. this is basically from where the odors are coming from. you want to know what this costs. that is what you are looking at there. while the total chemical addition has gone down, you will note that for sodium hypochlorite
and build community but also to reflect on the previous year, what challenges lie ahead of us. today at the board of supervisors, we recognized black history month. for me, that is always a reflection of the work of people that have come before us so that we can be where we are today. as asian americans, we think and appreciate the work of african- americans in advancing our civil-rights as asian-americans in this country. as we look toward the new year, i think we can say that the asian-american community has come far in san francisco since we first started immigrating here in the 1950's, and there were many challenges for our community, beginning with the first exclusion act, immigration and for men and women that came for san francisco, to labor issues, and also segregation that we faced. and that was then brought forward as a court case to look at what it means to be equal but separate in our public schools. there is much work we have done here, and now we see we have our first asian-american mayor, the first time we have seen four asian american sitting on the board of superviso
-- a different type of examination according to the top of power that we use. the previous gentleman was mentioning about how steam loops are a bad thing, and in the traditional fashion, they probably are. an apartment or units or development, instead of a traditional water boiler, a steam heater, whatever, yes, you are burning fossil fuel, but you are getting a 85% sun, 87% efficiency, instead of the below 50% efficiency is -- but you are getting a 85%, 87% efficiency, instead of the below 50% efficiency if you are using natural gas. i do not think we will get rid of that in the next 10 years, but i would really encourage you to move this as it is, and, believe me, on march 24, the next task force meeting, we are really hoping that is our last meeting, because there were two things that we were tasked with, including closing power plants, so it would really make my day. thank you. president vietor: thank you. public comments? any further public comments? i just wanted to clarify this amendment, and with the council's blessing, we can move it. this directs the general manager to retu
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
japan crews are trying to prevent a nuclear melt down. u.s. officials are trying to calm the nerves of americas who fear radiation can reach the west coast. >> we don't expect it to reach the west coast. >> we have the latest developments from the nuclear power plant, plus how one government age agency is beefing up radiation detection. >> crews are working around the clock at the fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. the crews are working to reconnect electricity to the cooling system to cool the rods. other crews are spraying and dumping water on the nuclear few. smoke can be seen from building number 2 right now. the cause is not known but a explosion hit the building on tuesday. it is possible the cooling chamber is damaged. low levels of radiation have been detected beyond tokyo, which is 140 miles south of the nuclear power plant. u.s. is warning americans to leave the country and the government is offering voluntary evacuations. today president obama spoke about the situation in japan. this is video of president obama visiting the japanese embassy. the president wrote a mes
. an opportunity to reflect on the many, many contributions of african-americans in this city and how each of us has changed the gee graval and cultural landscape of this city. how fitting that we celebrate black history month today, which is also the same as lunar new year and also an opportunity -- opportunity to reflect on the diversity of this city and how happy we are to be in a city which is so inclussive. so without forth delay i would like to welcome you on behalf of mator's office of neighborhood services. mayor lee will be joining us later. with the invocations, we would like to invite pastor stacey kerns. >> good amp. let us pause for a moment to invite the presence of god. shall we pray together? god, our help in ages past, our hope in years to come, we invite your holy presence to bless this celebration of african-american history month. we give up thanks and praise for the legacy, the creativity, the genius and contributions of african-american people everywhere. we pray that you would strengthen this organization and strengthen all organizations that support telling the story of b
was trying to help low- income immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. immigration rates started about 40 years ago and i started to see my client to come to me. my husband has been here 10 years and all of a sudden, his employer is asking for a work permit. we have two children. we just bought a home. what are we going to do?
will be heard following items six. that will allow us to come to some conclusions and take an official action in time for it to be shipped over to the clerk's office and properly noticed that the board. we will then -- when we come out of executive session, we will hear item 18. after that, we will continue with our normal order of business, including closed session for a second time on items 13, 14, 15a, one in two, and 16 and 17. seems to be quite a bit of litigation these days. that is the reason for that. last night, i had a productive session speaking to the order of jamestown, that uses our parks in partnership during our program. it was very encouraging, very well attended, and i think enthusiastically received. it was really a public/private partnership, and they were appealing to their constituents for support, and many city elected officials were there, and it was encouraging to see that people were recognizing that in these times of budget shortfall that public/private partnerships with a free park uses -- appropriate part uses seem very appropriate, at least in those quarters. i'm
>>> i want to on "nightline" another war? the breaking plus. u.s. and allies prepare to intervene in the bloody war in libya after the u.n. authorizes military action against gadhafi's forces. >> and in a worldwide exclusive, gadhafi's sons talk from tripoli tonight. >>> plus, nuclear code red. we have the latest on the desperate efforts of the japanese to stop the deadly chain of events from turning into a all-out nuclear catastrophe. are they at the point of no return? >>> and the inconvenient truth. the race to cool a stockpile of radioactive fuel rods getting dangerously hot and what scientists fear if that race is lost. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good evening. i'm cynthia mcfadden. we begin in libya where the u.s. and its allies appear poised to take military action on the heels of a u.n. resolution earlier this evening imposing a no-fly zone over the country and authorizing quote, all necessary measures to protect civilians. hours earlier, libya -- we spoke to gadhafi's son. christiane joins me now. you were just in libya, what can you tell us? >> well, i think they
of condolences today in washington calling for a safety review of all u.s. nuclear plants and offered assurances that harmful levels would not reach the west coast. >> now, state health officials are trying to reassure us tonight that the west coast does not face a serious threat from japan. this one is in san francisco. and uc berkeley scientists put up one on top of the engineering building. california's director of public health says reports are not true. >> there are winds shift sog some will be blowing west. almost all will get washed out by storms that are there and dissipate. >> dr. backer says there may be a slight increase in radiation over next few day buzz amount will be no greater than what we're exposed to on a daily basis. >> many people continue to have concerns about dangerous radiation reaching our shores. rain freedman has been following this story and not everyone believes what they hear from the government. >> that is true. it's more of mistrust. and there are a lot of people still buying radiation dedoctors on ebay, and are buying pills in stores. and there are people saying
basara. >> and i am stan stovall. thanks for joining us. >> john collins has a check on the forecast. >> a nice run-up yesterday with temperatures well into the 60's. we will continue it and we will keep going up as far as we can. temperatures this morning for our lows are where we would typically big for the highs for this time of year. a nice way to start the day. 55 -- is a dry atmosphere. the barometer is down a bit. have a southwest wind at 7. 52 at the maryland science center. we have some thin clouds that is filtering the moonlight this morning. a terrific day today. now we check traffic and see what is happening with kim dacey. >> things looking not bad overall for friday morning commute. nothing too major. we do have a crash at perry hall boulevard to watch for. any event-related closured for st. patrick's day. o'donnell street is closed and that will remain in effect through tomorrow morning. watch for that. outer loop of the ballot on the west side, 11 minutes. -- outer loop of the beltway on the west side, 11 minutes. 95 northbound, 10 minutes. this is a live look of the
administration's risk base driven approach to aviation security and specifically the use of advanced imaging technology. as a chief technology officer, i will focus on the aspects and lee will discuss the human aspect. before going into detail, the technology is vital to the nation's ability to keep travelers safe in the 9/11 world. we face a determined enemy bent on our way of life. they arrested a man planning an attack on the dc subway system and a young saw disrespectful frankly -- saudi man was arrested. whether it was a failed attack in 2009, the plot in october, or the intelligence plots we see every day, al-qaeda and intelligence groups continue to target our system. we have to detect today's threat, not yesterday's. we have a able system that works in several measures. one aspect of the check point is what we're hear to discuss today. mr. chairman, well hidden devices are among the gravest threat to security. while there's no sell veer bullet, this gives us the best opportunity to detect the threats. we piloted the technology in early 2007 knowing of these threats. following analys
can reuse it? >> it can be filtered out and used for other products. >> [speaking spanish] >> it is going to be a good thing for us to take used motor oil from customers. we have a 75-gallon tank that we used and we have someone take it from here to recycle. >> so far, we have 35 people. we have collected 78 gallons, if not more. these are other locations that you can go. it is absolutely free. you just need to have the location open. you are set to go. >> i'm your host of "culturewire," and today, here at electric works in san francisco. nice to see you today. thanks for inviting us in and showing us your amazing facility today. >> my pleasure. >> how long has electric works been around? >> electric works has been in san francisco since the beginning of 2007. we moved here from brisbane from our old innovation. we do printmaking, gallery shows, and we have a fabulous retail store where there are lots of fun things to find. >> we will look at all of that as we walk around. it is incredible to me how many different things you do. how is it you identify that san francisco wa
. the "new york times" reporting u.s. officials in the obama administration began to believe a no fly zone by itself would make no difference. these officials, "the times" reporting says began pushing for what's called a no drive zone, specifically the use of u.s. military air strikes to cut down gadhafi's ground forces to tanks and heavy artillery. the u.s. push for tonight's vote on the security council. the resolution approved 10-0 with five countries abstaining says that the u.n., quote, will take all necessary measures to protect civilians and civilian populated areas under threat of attack in libya including bin ghazi. if you're worried about u.s. ground forces going into libya, here is the next part of the resolution. while excluding a foreign occupation force of any form on any part of libyan territory. well, after the vote the united states ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, spoke to reporters today the security council has responded to the libyan people's cry for help. this council's purpose is clear. to protect innocent civilians. >> secretary of state hillary clinton said toda
at the airport -- at the inner harbor is 52 degrees. the reader is showing nothing around us except those thin clouds -- the radar is showing nothing except thin clouds. you do not see any rain of any substance. it will not be a big factor in the weather today. we will warm up with the south wind. right now we want to check on the traffic with kim dacey. >> not looking too bad. we have a couple of accidents in this city. one is that charles and cold spring. there is another and eastern. o'donnell street is closed at potomac for the st. patrick's day celebration through tomorrow morning. something to watch for. otherwise, we are up to speed on the major roadways. 11 minutes on the outer loop topside. 895 looking at 60 minutes. a very nice ride all around the area -- a 95 looking at 16 minutes. very light volume for this time of the morning. this is the beltway at providence road. things are moving just fine on the inner and outer loops. that is the latest on traffic pulse 11. back to you. >> the u.s. military says charter flights are leaving half fall from japan. many families have decided to s
for being with us tonight. we will see you again tomorrow night. now it is time for "the ed show oichlt. >> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show" tonight from new york. our lead story tonight, the u.n. security council has voted to impose a no fly zone over libya authorizing all necessary measures. we'll have that coming up. three reactors with partial meltdowns in japan and the desperate attempt to stop the worst from happening. and there is breaking news at this hour. the united nations security council has voted to allow the u.n.'s member nations to take military action against libya. the vote opens the door for the united states to begin air strikes against libya at any time. the "new york times" reporting u.s. officials in the obama administration began to believe a no fly zone by itself would make no difference. these officials, "the times" reporting says began pushing for what's called a no drive zone, specifically the use of u.s. military air strikes to cut down gadhafi's ground forces to tanks and heavy artillery. the u.s. push for tonight's vote on the security cou
and want to be saving dollars for the public utilities commission and the rate-payers by using the local ground water in place for irrigation or for increased daylighting. there are multiple opportunities for saving money. climbing change, thoughts climate change, urban forestry. -- climate change, urban forestry. this is not in my opinion just about mitigating flooding. the opportunities also in terms of the community engagement is also mapping the stakeholders. the stakeholders include multiple city agencies as well as residents and to the various ngo's. what we really need is a city- wide vision for the watershed and using it as a device, a framing device so that multiple decisions -- when we talk about the seven-foot by that is going in, what that pike has done is it is predicated a planning effort for the western sections of chavez such that we have a low drought tolerance landscaped going on on top of a flood plain. that does not compute. there is this function in that we are not actually speaking to the various entities, the various city agencies within this number frame of this p
captioning sponsored by wpbt . >> disasters like this remind us of the common humanity we share. >> president obama works to ease fears at home saying the u.s. is not at risk from the radiation. >> susie: japan's disaster is raising questions about u.s. nuclear liability and the yen's continued surge as we continue our coverage of the japanese crisis. you're watching nightly business report for thursday, march 17th. >> this is nightly business this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> tom: good evening, thanks for joining us tonight. president obama said today japan's nuclear crisis won't affect the united states, susie. >> susie: you know, tom, the president spoke this afternoon from the white house rose garden and said he doesn't expect a nuclear radiation to be a risk for people inside the united states. >> i want to be very clear. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states
used as an insult. >> welcome to the playground and recreation center. my name is naomi kelly, deputy city administrator for the city and county of san francisco. today's press conference, the purpose of the press conferences to announce the implementation plan for the san francisco locao into effect on march 25, 2011. the implementation of the city's new mandatory local hiring policy is a top priority for mayor lee. it will outline the steps taken, contractors, and the broader community for the san francisco local hiring policy for construction. the new local hiring policy will require contractors to meet mandatory levels of san francisco residents and participation. the goal is to provide predictability for all stakeholders by maximizing city resources and infrastructure to eliminate this location. i would like to acknowledge a few people. first, this park is named after his son, who was tragically taken from us to do to violence. he was a star athlete at balboa high school. he was in the process of being hired by recreation and parks. out of that tragedy, this very setting reminds
snowing in the disaster areas. >> u.s. officials closely monitoring this crisis say focus is on reactors three and four, where spent fuel rods under great danger of releasing plumes of radioactivity. >> there is no end to the nuclear crisis at the fukishima plant. the focus is reactors three and four, where old, spent fuel rods are releasing plumes of radioactivity. >> hollywood likes to focus on the melt down, melted core, exposed uranium. old fuel is more dangerous because there is more radiation in unguarded pond. >> the mission to cool reactors with helicopters dumping buckets of water failed. the japanese plan is to restart with a new power line, officials fear those may not work if energy is restored which is why the u.s. is sending a high pressure pump. >> all u.s. citizens in japan should continue to monitor situations and follow guidance of the u.s. and japanese governments. >> inside of the plant 180 workers at great right after this tok their lives are being reroe tated in and out of the danger zone. outside thousands are being evacuated. >> the government told us we're safe,
there is no sign dangerous radiation is coming here. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight, the u.s. navy is now racing to the rescue in japan. where there is word that electricity is about to return to the fukushima nuclear plant, and the u.s. is flying in five giant pumps from a navy base in nagasaki. they are pumps that can deliver enormous amounts of water, after we all watched today as the helicopters tried to spray water, but to no avail. our reporters are out in force on the story tonight. and we will go to japan in a moment. but first, let's head to martha raddatz who has been talking all day to the u.s. officials who are now helping the japanese. martha? >> reporter: diane, every day, the nuclear monster seems to get more frightening. but there is some hope tonight from that big u.s. push to send in water pumps. this coming after last ditch efforts by the japanese failed. one expert told us it's like using a squirt gun to put out a forest fire. japanese fire trucks using riot control water hoses to tackle red hot nuclear reactors. helicopters swooping overhead, dropping bucket af
-- and this is following up on some of the questions raised by commissioner lee -- is it your intent to use this as a guideline for prioritizing future funding? once the dust settles and you have the real numbers to work with. and i know that it will probably be a while, probably not this year, but in the next couple of years, it will really be looking at this more in an earnest, so is it -- what is your intent? are you really going to use this as a tool for establishing your priorities in the future? and for this year, do you see any kind of impacts where you might, in terms of establishing your core values and setting your priorities, where you would use this to guide you? >> we definitely plan to use this. as we mentioned in the beginning, and i think there is a slide on this powerpoint, it talks about we had a mandated three-year cycle. then the second year is use the needs assessment to come up with exactly what you're talking about, the action plan. so what will our department specifically do in terms of prioritizing what populations, what types of services, and that is a public docum
continue to engage community in imagining with us what the geneva car barn can mean. its significance for community and enhancement of life. i just want to point out, that block of text that is to the right of the frame on this side -- is called a word cloud. it is representative of a workshop event we had a few weeks ago with 400 people from the district to we brought together to think about their aspirations, the issues and concerns that they thought the car barn, once fully realized, would address in their community. i would also like to say we continue to work with community residents, merchants, and artists, to lift of art and culture in the district. most recently, we have joined with the district 11's arts council. revenue models. how are we paying for this? in the last stages of strategic work, we have identified three revenue models for the geneva car barn, once fully realized. and of course, there are contributed income that come from foundations. we have a dead by sources that will actually pay you to work in the program that will be run out of the barn. one of the more int
evening to our viewers joining us in the west. while the japanese deal with a staggering humanitarian crisis, they are now engaging in a last-resort effort to stop perhaps multiple meltdowns at nuclear reactors. and today president obama had to reassure the american public especially those along the west coast, that these fears of some sort of radioactive cloud coming across the pacific just aren't true. here now the latest on the disaster in japan. desperate measures now under way to lessen the nuclear disaster. while tonight japanese officials are saying they have rare good news of some levels stabilizing, late today we got the first look at the reactors close up. this new video of a helicopter fly-over showing the destruction. then there are the numbers. just under 5700 dead, just under 10,000 missing and over three-quarters of a million people surviving without electricity in near freezing cold. thousands of people, including americans, continue to flee japan. we want to get the very it latest now and begin our reporting with nbc's robert bazell in tokyo. bob, good evening. >> rep
... at a carry-out. it happened about 9 o-clock last night... inside "u-s fried chicken" along pennsylvania avenue.one person was shot in the lee and another in the throat.homicide investigators were called to the scene a car crash leaves ne person dead thhs morning.it happened arrund 2 o clock on honeygo boulevaad and ebenezer road in perry hall.one car crashed into a light pole with the passenger being thrown from it. that person was pronounced dead at the scene.the dirver is listed in serious conditon at the hospital. the baltimore solicitor says the mayor did not violate ethics laws by voting on contraats involving johns hopkins university.baltimore's ethics code says public officials should not vote on conttacts if relatives have a financial interest.stephanie rawliigs blake's husband works for a group within the johns hopkins health system since december.sse voted on 22 contracts involving the university... not johns &phopkins health system. anne arundel county executive john leopolddis &pserved with a subpoena... for a probe into whether he mis- used his state-funded security detail
nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop genocide. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has be
where could the first strikes come from? perhaps u.s. naval vessels. cruise missiles could be involved. there are nato air bases that could be used in any no-fly zone. one immediate concern, the libyan military, while not powerful, has a stro anti-aircraft surface-to-air missile system here. watch for strikes first in the days ahead. we'll be on top this tomorrow as well as the japan crisis. "in the arena" right now. >>> good evening, i'm eliot spitzer, welcome to the program. will cain and gloria borger join plea and we'll go to anderson cooper in a moment on the story of the most desperate methods to stem the radiation from the crippled nuclear reactors. photos taken from military aircraft by people who surely risked their lives show just how grave the damage is. look at that and imagine how difficult it will be to save the crippled facility. but first, breaking news just coming in. there could, emphasis could, be an attack on libya very soon, indeed within hours. the battle for benghazi, the battle for libya may well be about to begin. this after the united nations passe
is shock, sadness. people are telling us that they can't believe that this is how this case has gone. although one person told me just a few moments ago that, when they heard originalally that the murder victim was brought back to the store because the coworker had forgotten something and needed to get back into the store after hours last friday night, at the time, they thought that was strange and then gave it not another thought until now hearing a source confirming to fox 5 news that the arrest in this case is apparently the surviving 27-year-old coworker who, herself, seemed to have been attacked and beat en and perhaps sexually assaulted in this case. that's what authorities, montgomery county police had told us from last saturday onward, that both had been beaten, both had been sexually assaulted. one left for dead, the other who survive the night was discovered last saturday morning by a coworker coming to open the store who then grabbed a passerby who then called police. we're going to find out a lot more about this in about an hourperhaps a motive, how police were able to wo
>> glenn: from new york, good night america. >>> president obama warns muammar khadafy that the u.s. is ready to join an allied effort to protect civilians. a judge in wisconsin blocks the new collective bargaining law from taking effect and nuclear fallout from japan gets an upgrade. live from our studio in washington is special report. >> brett: u.s. ambassador susan rice says muammar khadafy is in violation of resolution that demanded a cease-fire in libya. they called on khadafy to halt military attacks on civilians and if the libyan leader does not stand down, the u.s. will launch military action against him. but he said the summit will not send ground troops into the country. we have team coverage. doug is at the pentagon with the u.s. role and logistics of implementing a no-fly zone. we begin with senior correspondent with rick leventhal who is live in libya in benghazi. >> reporter: it's safe to say that we've seen more check points popping up, more young men with small arms and concern about khadafy's army with libyan official on live television saying that the army was act
of fighting government rebels after the u.n.-approved use of force in a no-fly zone in an effort to protect civilians on the ground from moammar qaddafi's forces. qaddafi warned hell would await anyone that attacked his country. >> we'll answer them. our response will make their lives hell as well as they are making our lives well. they will never enjoy peace because this is injustice. martha: i'm martha mccallum. rick: i'm rick folbaum. >> this resolution should send a strong message to colonel qaddafi and his regime that the violence must stop, the killing must stop and the people of libya mist be protected and have the opportunity to express themselves freely. qaddafi has lost his legitimacy. there is no justification for his leadership now that he perpetrated violence against his own people. rick: this is video of an air strike against a rebel camp near benghazi. martha: david, what specifically does this resolution authorize? report it imposes a no supply zone over libya. it says all libyan flights. but if you look at the language of this resolution it's much broader. it says all neces
that help us to get to that wholesale market change that needs to happen to become greenhouse gases -- gas free. and these others fall under the heading to make sure that san francisco continues its reliable service, and you can see those listed there. we are building on some policies the commission recently adopted with respect to environmental justice and community benefits, as well. as i mentioned, this plan was through an extensive public process, where we had meetings with our clean energy storages, we had several hearings before the board, -- clean energy stewards, we have had hearings before the board, and we have had subcommittee meetings. lafco. we have come to you today, and we are looking for you to endorse this plan being delivered to the board of supervisors for their endorsement of the overall goals. we are also looking for -- commissioner torres: when is that going to be presented? >> it will not be presented unless you release us to do so. i am here to ask you to do that. commissioner torres: is authorization is provided, when do you plan to do that -- if authorization is p
them. there are a number of initiatives that are helping us to understand our own vulnerability locally. i will move forward to the costs. the commission asks how much we are spending on this climate change resilience work. those costs are summarized to a large degree here starting with the most expensive item which is the single adaptation item. this is estimated at about 10- $20 million which is pending any future design work that my show that that figure needs to be changed. we have done some investing in a white papers that have been very educational for us with the water utility climate alliance and the calibration budget. each of these had been left wrist by significant investments from other places and i think it illustrates one of the advantages with the coalition that we have been doing. we can make an investment and understanding better these issues and follow that with many investments from others that make the project program and our understanding that much more robust. we have money coming into the project to bring these people together to do the work. what is not included
to name. they beat to the drum beats of liberty. the difference between us and the shadows of fear is we have a lot more space to breathe. yet the smell of equality is found outside and sexuality is the right to physical expression between consenting adults. we can live outside of the closets but not out of the house. they are not welcome in the open fields of america. where others dream of marriage or defend our country. because not all of god's children were worthy to see the light beyond these cold, white walls. as long as we remain indoors. sometimes visit our souls. taking the time to join us, unable to come out and play. in only we could run and discover land starving for diversity. the emptiness and our perversions and sins as preached from religion pens, it touch the openings of children child faint sounds emerge from under closet doors. there are too many of us in this house located on a land far a war from normal chanting. we only want to be outside. we only want to be outside. the lord is outside. it's not wonder some would rather die moths in the closet while others are not f
residents not to worry about radiation plume expected to reach the u.s. later today. >>> also this morning another major story unfolding. the u.n. backed libya's rebels approving a no-fly zone and clearing the path for military action against moammar gadhafi as early as today. we'll bring you the very latest from both libya and japan, "early" this friday morning, march 18th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good friday morning to you, i'm erica hill. >> i'm chris wragge. good morning to you. following two major stories on the "early" show this morning. >> of course we're looking at japan. but libya, as we mentioned briefly, the u.n. security council voting to approve that no-fly zone. as you can imagine, there are some strong reaction from moammar gadhafi. he's seen in the video there. many saying this really does pave the way for a military action. what could that mean? what could it look like? we'll get you the very latest on that coming up here. >> exactly. but first let's begin with the very latest on the disaster in japan. the danger level is being raised in
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
will take charge? what role will the u.s. play and did the hundredth vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of a deal? we'll try to answer those questions as we prepare to fingt third muslim count -- fight in m country. >>> japanese more or less admit they are overwhelmed. wow. they are ememploying it throw against the wall and see what sticks approach ahead of the u.s. nuclear commission says it could takes wakes to get this under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. a judge has temporarily blocked that new law shrinking collective bargaining rights. democrats hope that's the first of many obstacles. republicans say it's a speed bump. libya. we know how we're getting in. how will we get out? we start with the growing cry slinsia. richard engel is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard. give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the condition of the rebel force, especially benghazi. >> reporter: the rebel force is very weak in benghazi and across the country. what happened was the rebels
as president obama works to assure americans there is no radiation risk in the u.s. fox 5 morning news continues right now. >>> we're going to get started at 6:00 thon friday as we look live over washington, d.c. this morning. it will be a nice one. temperatures already nice out there this mourn. it will be a great day. good morning, thank you for waking up with fox 5 morning news. i'm sarah simmons. >>> i'm steve chenevey, thank you for being with us this friday morning. let's say good morning to tony perkins. >> good morning everybody. not a bad day on tap for us. let's take a look, get to it, your satellite-radar composite, no moisture or precipitation out there i should say. humidity levels 75, 76%. we do have clouds across the region this morning. i do think we will feature some clouds during the course of the day. will we see sunshine? yes, there will be clouds around as well. nothing in the way of precipitation for us during the day. off to the west you could see a little shower or two later on. temperature, i will pull this out for you. you can see the big picture, more clouds
on the u.s. for more help. the non-stop battle. >>> japan's newest heroes, firefighters volunteering to fight the nuclear monster. >>> good morning. we begin with breaking news in the middle east. the u.s. and allies are preparing for a military strike against the government of moammar gadhafi. >> it comes after a vote from the u.n. security council to protect civilians at all costs. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. for weeks now, the world condemned moammar gadhafi's people. now this puts force behind the words. four decades of moammar gadhafi's rule are challenged with a vote. >> translator: ten votes in favor. zero votes against. >> reporter: the u.n. security council voted a no-fly zone to protect rebels. >> this resolution demands an immediate cease-fire and an end to violence and attacks to civilians. >> reporter: this comes weeks after rebel resis tense. gadhafi said attacks are imminent. he said we are coming. we are looking for the traitors and should have no mercy or c e compassi compassion. gadhafi's son said his family is not afraid. >> what is your
? what role will the u.s. play? and did the u.n. vote come too late to stop gadhafi? will gadhafi fight for the death or accept some kind of deal. answer those questions as we prepare to fight in a third muslim country. and japanese authorities have raised the assessment of a nuclear disaster to a five -- that's three mile island level on a seven-point scale and they now more or less at mitt they're overwhelmed. they're employing a throw against the wall and see what sticks approach in the nuclear commission. it says it can take weeks to get this thing under control. score one for the unions in wisconsin. the judge has temporarily blocked the new law shrinking collective bargaining rights in that state. wow, democrats hope this is the first of many obstacles. republicans say, it's just a speed bump, check it out. let me finish with libya. we know how we're getting in. but do you have any idea how we're going to get out? we start on libya. richard engle is joining us from cairo. thank you, richard, give us a sense of what's happening as the u.n. begins to take action. what is the conditi
? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. the nuclear crisis in japan moves into its second week. and this morning, the head of the u.n.'s nuclear energy agency says japan is racing against the clock. here's the latest. engineers hope to reconnect electricity to at least two of the reactors at the fukushima daiichi power plant sometime today. but, it is unclear if any of the cooling systems will work. smoke is rising from reactor number 2, but officials don't know why. fire trucks are now being used to spray water on the plant, and attempts to use helicopters have been discontinued. japanese officials said today they are asking the u.s. government for help. charlie d'agata is in niigata, japan, with more. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: good morning to you, betty. nobody is watching the events unfolding at the nuclear power plant more closely than the people here. many who were evacuated from the region around that plant and wonder if they'll ever be able to go home. fire trucks resumed blasting water onto japan's crippl
by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. president obama put libya on notice today saying the u.s. and its allies are ready for military action. tom, the president's message was aimed at libyan leader moammar qaddafi. >> tom: susie, speaking at the white house, president obama said qaddafi must end the violence and pull back troops from towns under attack. >> let me be clear, these terms are not negotiable. if qaddafi does not comply, the resolution will be enforced through military action. >> susie: ahead of the president's warning, libya said it's ceasing all military action and will begin talking with opposition groups. that came after a vote at the united nations calling for a no- fly zone over the country. not surprisingly, oil markets were volatile today. crude prices closed down 35 cents to settle at $101 a barrel, off their high of $103. as suzanne pratt reports the oil market is coping with a long list of issues. >> reporter: in the past week much of the world has been fixated on japan, with one exception. the global oil market is paying much more attention to bubbling co
but unequal. it is understates rights -- is under states' rights. after lincoln had freed us from slavery, they instituted this law, separate but equal, and the state had sanctioned it. but everything there was, even when they had things that were federal, they would put a rope up, and the white people would be on one side, and the black people on the other side. i prayed. i'm a baptist. i hope was that the people would hear about the injustices. [applause] >> thank you very much for giving us those highlights. we want to move to a different era in this nation's history, when those signs are no longer present, but their presence is felt. with that, i turned t to bryonn bain. >> i am supposed to perform a piece, but i just feel like i want to talk to you. can i bring the format and do that? is that ok? i am honored and humbled to be aired. i want to acknowledge the presence of my elders, ancestors who made it possible for me to be here today. i am away by -- the more i hear, the more i read, the more i research -- i was not doing anything nearly as courageous at 18 years old. looking back,
[ laughter ] >> bret: it wasn't us. if you really didn't like that, can you tweet me at breath underscore baier. make it a great weekend. fair, balanced and unafraid. >> shepard: tonight, two major stories. in libya, new denials from my maury qaddafi as we hear new reports his army is on the move and slaughtering his people. now new signs the u.s. navy is ready to take action. and the crisis in japan. experts raise the threat level now amid severe damage at the nuclear plant at fukushima. a high probability of significant public exposure even death. i'm serpd smith live in new york. the news starts now. >> helicopters, water canons, they tried fire hoses. now, it may be time to try something else. tonight, exploring the chernobyl option. is libya backing down? after the united nations okayed a no-fly zone, the regime reportedly declared a cease-fire. what's really going on on the ground. >> this is a fluid and dynamic situation. >> once more, my maury qaddafi has a choice. >> tonight, is is qaddafi playing games and is it time to use force? >> shepard: first from fox this frida
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technolo
libya. what it could mean for u.s. military. computer hackers targeting celeb's private e-mail files and compromising pictures. now a federal investigation is under way. >>> let's start with moammar gadhafi changing course in response to the u.n. security council vote to impose a no-fly zone over libya and use all necessary measures to protect civilians. a no-fly zone could bring the u.s. military into libya with air strikes. some people are questioning, does this mean a third military engagement for an already-pressed u.s. military? gadhafi has imposed a cease-fire halting all military operations. this is a complete 180 for the leader who promised fierce attacks if libya was bombed. "the new york times" says four of its journalists who were reported missing in libya have been found. "the times" said all four were captured by forces loyal to gadhafi and will be released. we'll keep you posted on developments in this story. >>> that frantic battle to contain a nuclear situation growing more serious by the moment. japan is asking the u.s. for help and a very, very small part
on the significant challenges we all face. for the benefit of all san franciscans. i hope to move us past the labels that have pigeonholed us at city hall or at least to not be bound by them. because if you're a so-called moderate, then i'm a moderate. i've spent the past two decades trying to make this city work, to work for all of us. for its entire history, people have flocked to san francisco with their hopes and with their dreams. they've invested in this city, not only with their money but with their sweat and with their blood. i understand that not only do people need to flourish here, but business needs to flourish here. i understand what is at stake. what is invested here in all senses of that word. it's our responsibility to see that this investment isn't squandered. but with all due respect to the talent of many leaders with whom i share this responsibility, i was a progressive before progressive was a political faction in this town. [applause] years ago, years ago, i fought the establishment to make this city function better, to make our communities more inclusive. i fought for justice.
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